Dec 08, 2021  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Academic Regulations



Classification of Students

A first-year student is a regular student who has satisfactorily completed fewer than eight courses that carry a minimum of three credit hours each.

A sophomore is a regular student who at the beginning of the fall or spring semester has satisfactorily completed at least eight courses (3 or more credit hours each) but fewer than 18 courses and 54 credits.

A junior is a regular student who at the beginning of the fall or spring semester has satisfactorily completed at least 18 courses (3 or more credit hours each) but fewer than 29 courses and 87 credits.

A senior is a regular student who at the beginning of the fall or spring semester has satisfactorily completed at least 29 courses (3 or more credit hours each) and at least 87 credits.

A regular student is one who is matriculated in a degree program on either a full-time or part-time basis.

A full-time student is one who carries 12 or more credit hours in any given semester.

A part-time student is one who carries fewer than 12 credit hours in any given semester.

A special student is one who, whether full-time or part-time, is provisionally accepted and has previously attended college.

A special student in the day program who desires to follow a degree program may be given a maximum of two semesters to earn status as an accepted student. The amount of time granted will be determined by the Admissions Committee at the time of the student’s admission as a special student. A special student who fulfills the stipulations in his/her letter will be notified by the director of admissions that his/her status has been changed to accepted. If the student fails to achieve the minimum requirements outlined in the Admissions Special Student letter, the student will not be permitted to continue at the University. Once the student has been admitted as a regular student, the credits earned as a special student may be applied retroactively to the degree program.

A provisional student is one who is taking courses full-time at the University but is provisionally accepted, and has had no previous college experience. Provisional students become accepted students after the successful completion of two semesters at the University, fulfilling the minimum requirements outlined in the Provisional Student letter. If these provisions are met, the student is notified by the director of admissions that his/ her status has been changed to accepted, and the courses already taken will be applied to the degree. If the student fails to achieve the minimum requirements after two semesters, the student will not be permitted to continue at the University.

A Continuing Education or ACCESS student has a different primary role from that of the traditional student. The circumstances that surround the life of the ACCESS student ordinarily demand involvement in primary life roles other than education and necessarily divide the student’s energies. Usually, ACCESS students are beyond the traditional college age and/or have greater independence and more responsibilities outside of education than the traditional student. ACCESS students typically are homemakers, workers, or retirees, and do not live in the residence halls. They normally restrict their use of college services to the ACCESS Office, Registrar’s Office, Treasurer’s Office, classrooms, library, computer center, snack bar, and bookstore. Participation in the LVAIC cross registration program is specified in the section entitled Interinstitutional Cooperation. Once students are accepted into ACCESS, they are ordinarily not permitted to take courses at other colleges for transfer purposes except as noted in the policy on Supplemental LVAIC Cross Registration or unless special circumstances are noted and approved in writing by the executive director of ACCESS. However, courses from other colleges can be transferred into ACCESS at the time of admission providing the courses meet DeSales University criteria. The right to classify students (e.g., as regular day, special, or ACCESS) is reserved to DeSales University. Day students whose status has changed and who desire to be reclassified as Continuing Education or ACCESS students must submit a written request to the office of enrollment management. This request must usually be documented with a letter from the student’s employer specifying that the student is employed full-time and receives a full benefit package, or tax returns showing that the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s) do not claim the student as a dependent. A reclassification is not retroactive but takes effect at the beginning of the next semester or session that follows the letter of reclassification. Those who are classified as Continuing Education or ACCESS students qualify for the ACCESS tuition rate.

Confidentiality of Student Records

Annual Notification of Rights Under FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s educational records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the University has contracted; a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee or assisting another school official in performing his or her responsibilities.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the US Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of the FERPA:

Family Policy Compliance Office
US Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information

The University may use its discretion to disclose directory information about students upon request unless specifically informed by the student in writing that this type of information should not be released. Directory information includes:

  • student name
  • address and telephone number (local and permanent)
  • major field(s) of study
  • enrollment status
  • class schedule
  • sports and activities participation
  • most previous school attended
  • height/weight of athletic team members
  • photographs
  • birthdate
  • e-mail address
  • dates of attendance, degrees and awards
  • high school attended

Written requests to withhold the release of directory information must be submitted to the Office of the registrar no later than September 15. This request will be honored for one year. Written notice must be received annually to renew this request.

Class Recording Policy

By registering for or attending DeSales University courses, individuals consent to the recording of classes within the scope of the DeSales University Class Recording Policy, available at www.desales.edu/policies.

Rights, Responsibilities, and Freedoms of Students

Copies of the Student Handbook are on file in the student affairs office and online

Grading System

The following system of grades is used:

A = 4.0 quality points
A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3
B = 3.0
B- = 2.7
C+ = 2.3
C = 2.0
C- = 1.7
D+ = 1.3
D = 1.1
F = 0.0

A/A- Indicates mastery of the course content accompanied by evidence of exceptional achievement in critical, independent, and creative thought competently expressed.

B+/B/B- Indicates a good grasp of course content accompanied by evidence of a marked achievement in critical, independent, and creative thought competently expressed.

C+/C/C- Indicates an adequate grasp of course content accompanied by evidence of an average achievement in critical, independent, and creative thought and the capacity to express it.

D+/D Indicates a limited grasp of course content and evidence of minimal achievement in critical, independent, and creative thought.

F indicates an insufficient grasp of course content with evidence of an unacceptably low achievement in critical, independent, and creative thought.

FA Failure because of excessive absence. (See Attendance Policy below.)

I Incomplete: The mark of an Incomplete is given only in instances where the student is near the end of the semester/session and through no fault of his or her own is unable to complete course requirements.

Traditional Day Program: The maximum time limit for the make-up of an Incomplete is four months from the last day of the semester in which the Incomplete was given; otherwise, unless an extension of this limit is granted in writing by the Dean of Undergraduate Education, the grade becomes an “F.” The last day of the semester is specified in the academic semester calendar.

ACCESS Program: The maximum time for the make-up of an Incomplete is eight weeks from the end of the previous session/semester in which the Incomplete was given; otherwise, unless an extension of this limit is granted in writing by the assistant dean of lifelong learning, the grade becomes an “F.” The last day of the semester is specified in the ACCESS calendar.

Incompletes as Pre-Requisites. An unresolved incomplete course that carries over into the subsequent academic term may prevent a student from beginning another course(s) for which the incomplete is a pre-requisite.

AU Audit (no credit)

PO Pass on Pass-Fail option. (See The Pass-Fail Option below)

FO Failure on Pass-Fail option

P Satisfactory

W Official withdrawal

WP Official withdrawal, passing at time of withdrawal

WF Official withdrawal, failing at time of withdrawal

Grade Change

The maximum time limit to request a grade change (other than an Incomplete) is six months from the last day of the semester in which the grade was given. The last day of the semester is specified in the academic calendar.

The Pass-Fail Option

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may take courses under the pass-fail option under the following conditions:

  1. This option may be used for only one course per semester taken as a free elective, or for an internship. 
  2. The pass-fail option requires the approval of the student’s academic advisor and of the course instructor (except for internships, as stated below).
  3. Neither mark, PO (pass) or FO (fail), is computed in the student’s grade point average. The mark of PO indicates that the student receives full credit for the course toward graduation; the mark of FO indicates that he or she has failed the course and must repeat it, or an equivalent, under the usual procedures.
  4. Students may not take any courses required for a minor under the pass-fail option.

A student may switch from pass-fail to letter grade (or from letter grade to pass-fail) by submitting an Approval Form to the Registrar’s Office by the deadline indicated on the academic calendar.

Auditing

An auditing student is permitted to attend lectures and, with the permission of the instructor, to take part in class discussions. The auditing student does not take examinations, receive grades, or earn credits. The approval of the instructor in the course to be audited and of the student’s academic advisor must be secured for a student to audit any course. For full-time students, there is no additional tuition for auditing a course. For part-time students, the tuition is approximately one-half that charged per credit hour (applicable course fee will be charged at approximately half the normal fee). A course audited may not be repeated for credit unless approved in writing by the associate dean of academic life. The instructor may request of the associate dean of academic life that an auditing student be officially withdrawn from the course whenever it is clear that the student is not profiting from the course or that the auditing student’s presence in the class is interfering with the learning process of the other students. A student may switch from audit to credit (or from credit to audit) with the permission of the instructor and the academic advisor until the deadline date indicated in the academic calendar.

Attendance Policy for Traditional Day Students

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. If absences do occur, regardless of the reason, it is the student’s responsibility to continue fulfilling the requirements of each course, including making up any work that has been missed. Instructors are under no obligation to make special arrangements for students who are absent.

Students who miss an announced quiz or examination may be given an “F” for that quiz or examination at the discretion of the instructor. Permission to make up laboratory assignments, studios, quizzes, announced tests, or examinations may be granted at the discretion of the instructor.

All first-year students, and any upperclass students who are on probation, are limited to the number of absences equivalent to two weeks of class in a sixteen-week course (i.e. no more than six absences for a course that meets three or more times per week, no more than four absences for a course that meets two times per week, and no more than two absences for a course that meets one time per week). In courses that run for eight weeks or less, first-year students and students on probation are limited to the number of absences equivalent to one week of class. An absence on class days preceding and following a holiday is counted as a double absence. Students who exceed the maximum number of absences in a given course may be barred from examinations and may be issued a failing grade at the discretion of the instructor.

Regular class attendance for sophomores, juniors, and seniors is encouraged, but typically not compulsory. DeSales University presumes that upperclass students will be mature and responsible enough to understand that voluntary regular attendance at classes is necessary if course requirements are to be fulfilled adequately. An instructor may ask a student to justify excessive absences. Instructors may also stipulate, with the approval of their division head, their own attendance policy for upperclass students, provided that this policy is published in writing at the beginning of the course and that it is no more restrictive than the policy described above for all first-year students and any upperclass students who are on probation.

ACCESS Students should refer to the ACCESS Attendance Policy in Section 6 .

No-Show Policy

Students are required to attend class to confirm their enrollment at DeSales University. This includes logging in to Blackboard and attempting assignments for online classes prior to the drop/add deadline following the first week of class. Students reported as no-shows by their instructor will be dropped from class and are ineligible for financial aid funding for such courses.

Grade Reporting

Midterm grades are issued only to traditional students and are not part of the student’s permanent record. Final grades are issued to all traditional day students and ACCESS students on the dates indicated on the official Academic Calendar. Final grades become part of a student’s permanent record. Grades are posted on student WebAdvisor accounts and are not mailed. However, if a student wants a hard copy grade report mailed to his/her permanent address, the student must go to the Academic Profile tab located in WebAdvisor for Students, click Mail Grade Report Request, and check the box next to Grade Report Request.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The student is required to maintain a specific grade point average to be in acceptable academic standing, to maintain financial aid eligibility, and to graduate. The grade point average is calculated in the following way:

The quality points per course are determined by multiplying the number of credit hours (1, 2, 3, etc.) by the number of quality points assigned to the grade received (e.g., A = 4.0 quality points). The sum of the quality points received for all courses is then divided by the number of credit hours attempted.

Quality points per course = credit hours multiplied by quality points.

Grade Point Average = sum of the quality points of all courses divided by the number of credit hours attempted.

Only courses for which a letter grade is given are computed into the grade point average. Only the higher grade is counted for a repeated course. Courses accepted in transfer are awarded credits not grades or quality points.

Dean’s List

The Dean’s List is published each semester. To be eligible for this list, a day or ACCESS-by-day student must have taken no fewer than 12 credit hours (excluding pass/fail and audited courses) and attained a grade point average of 3.5 or better during the semester in question. A student with a grade of Incomplete for a given semester is not eligible for the Dean’s List for that semester until the Incomplete has been removed. Special students are not eligible for Dean’s List.

ACCESS students are recognized on an ACCESS Dean’s List when they have earned 9 credit hours (excluding pass/fail and audited courses) and attained a grade point average of 3.5 in fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Graduation

Students must apply for graduation (degree conferral) via WebAdvisor by the deadline date indicated on the official Academic Semester Calendar. All transfer work must appear on an official transcript and be received in the Registrar’s Office by the deadline for final grades as indicated on the official Academic Calendar. All students must pay the graduation processing fee and successfully complete all degree requirements to be eligible for graduation. There are three opportunities to graduate each year: January, May, and September. The Commencement ceremony is held in May.

Request to Participate in Commencement as a Non-Graduate

Students may request to attend baccalaureate, march in the May Commencement ceremony, and receive a diploma cover from the President as long as they are on track to complete degree requirements by January 31 following Commencement. Non-graduates only march in one Commencement ceremony, and are not eligible for Commencement Honors.

Conditions:

  1. The student must apply no later than the week prior to May Commencement.
  2. If approved by the Registrar and division head, the student will be able to march in the Commencement ceremony and be seated with his/her primary major.
  3. Students in the following programs are not eligible to participate in Commencement as a non-graduate: MSN, MSPAS, DNP, and DPT.

Commencement Honors

DeSales University awards commencement honors for outstanding academic achievement as follows: 

Effective with the Class of 2023
In order to qualify for honors, the student must have completed at least half to their degree in graded courses at DeSales University.

Cum laude: for a cumulative GPA of 3.5 to 3.649
Magna cum laude: for a cumulative GPA of 3.65 to 3.79
Summa cum laude: for a cumulative GPA of 3.8 to 4.0
 

Current policy effective for graduates prior to the Class of 2023
Cum laude: for a cumulative GPA of 3.25 to 3.49
Magna cum laude: for a cumulative GPA of 3.50 to 3.74
Summa cum laude: for a cumulative GPA of 3.75 to 4.0

Honorary Societies

In 1971, DeSales University was given approval to establish a chapter (Delta Delta) of Delta Epsilon Sigma, a national scholastic honor society for students, faculty, and alumni of Catholic colleges and universities.

Other honorary societies at DeSales University include Alpha Alpha Alpha (first-generation students), Alpha Sigma Lambda (continuing education), Chi Tau Epsilon (dance), Delta Mu Delta (business), Kappa Delta Pi (education), Kappa Mu Epsilon (mathematics), Phi Alpha Theta (history), Pi Sigma Alpha (political science), Psi Chi (psychology), Sigma Theta Tau (Mu Omicron Chapter) (nursing), Sigma Tau Delta (English), and Theta Alpha Kappa (theology).

Acceptable Academic Standing

Students are said to be in acceptable academic standing if they earn the minimum applicable cumulative grade point average listed below, based on the number of credits attempted:

Credits Attempted

Minimum Cumulative GPA

Credit Hours 12-23

1.25

Credit Hours 24-47

1.60

Credit Hours 48-62

1.80

Credit Hours 63+

2.00

 

Students with fewer than 24 credit hours attempted whose cumulative GPA is under 1.25 will be placed on academic probation. Furthermore, those under a 1.00 term GPA will also be liable for dismissal, (see the sections on Academic Probation for Traditional Day Students and Academic Probation for ACCESS students below). Students with fewer than 24 credit hours attempted whose cumulative GPA is greater than or equal to 1.25 but under 1.50 will receive an academic warning. Incomplete grades (“I”) are considered attempted credits in the calculation of Acceptable Academic Standing.

In the case of transfer students, the number of credit hours transferred will be added to the number of credit hours attempted at DeSales University to determine the applicable minimum cumulative grade point average.

All students are expected to achieve acceptable academic standing. Students who fail to achieve acceptable academic standing will be placed on Academic Probation an this will be noted on their transcripts at the end of the fall and/or spring semesters. Students who fail to achieve acceptable standing for two consecutive semesters are subject to review by the Academic Regulations Committee.

Academic Probation for Traditional Day Students

Academic probation constitutes a formal warning to students that they are no longer in acceptable academic standing because their academic work has fallen below the standards set forth above or because they have received a grade point average below 1.00 in their last semester (fall or spring). Students who have either fallen below the standards set forth above for two consecutive semesters or have received a grade point average below 1.00 for one semester are liable for dismissal from the University. These students must appear before the Academic Regulations Committee, convince the committee that they would benefit from another semester at the University, and be approved for return by the dean of undergraduate education to continue their studies. Students who have either fallen below the standards set forth above for one semester or have been permitted to return to the University as a result of an appeal to the Academic Regulations Committee are given one additional probationary semester to achieve acceptable academic standing. If they fail to accomplish this, they are liable for dismissal. During this additional semester they are on academic probation. Probationary status for a completed fall or spring semester cannot be revoked or changed by subsequently using summer or winter coursework to alter a student’s GPA. Students on academic probation are subject to the following regulations:

  1. Students on academic probation are not eligible to participate on a DeSales University intercollegiate sports team.
  2. Students will be strongly encouraged to reduce their course load to four courses during any probationary period.
  3. Students on academic probation are strongly encouraged to consult with their academic advisor on a monthly basis during any period of probation. Failure to consult with the advisor will be a major criterion for determining grounds for dismissal. Advisors will review students’ academic progress and at the same time provide assistance in academic or related matters to help students return to acceptable academic standing.
  4. Probationary students will be restored to good academic standing if, at the end of the probationary semester or next summer session, they meet the standards indicated above. Such students may also take Summer Session courses at DeSales University and be restored to acceptable academic standing before the probationary semester begins if they meet the same standards.
  5. If at the end of one probationary semester students have not achieved acceptable academic standing, but, in the opinion of the Academic Regulation Committee, they have a reasonable chance of attaining acceptable academic standing, one additional probationary semester will be allowed.
  6. Students who have received a warning of academic probation for two consecutive semesters will be liable to dismissal.
  7. Upperclassmen who are on academic probation are subject to the same class attendance policy as first-year students.

Academic Probation for ACCESS Students

All ACCESS students are expected to achieve acceptable academic standing as defined above. ACCESS students who fail to achieve acceptable academic standing will be placed on Academic Probation and this will be noted on their transcripts at the end of the fall and/or spring semesters. Students who have received a warning of academic probation for two consecutive semesters will be liable to dismissal.

Overload

An overload of one course (of three or more credits) per semester may be permitted, subject to the approval of a student’s academic advisor, provided that the student has achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. An overload of two courses per semester may be permitted, subject to the approval of the advisor, provided that the student has achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or better. For the purposes of this policy, three one-credit courses taken during a semester will be considered an overload unless one of these is a P.E. course.

Course Withdrawal Policy

A student may drop any course during the first week of each semester. In the event of such a drop, the course is not listed on his or her permanent record. Subsequent withdrawal requires the approval of the advisor and the Director of the Academic Success Center for traditional day students. Administrative approval by the ACCESS Office is required for ACCESS students. The last day for course withdrawal is the date published in the Academic Calendar. The last date for dropping or adding courses is also published in the Academic Calendar.

If a student withdraws from a course, he/she will be given a grade of either W (Withdrawal), WP (Withdrawal Pass), or WF (Withdrawal Fail), at the instructor’s discretion. The grade given in such instances will become part of the student’s permanent record but will not be used in the computation of his or her grade point average. Students who withdraw from the university after the course withdrawal deadline will receive failing grades (F) in all courses.

By withdrawing from a course, a student may be in jeopardy of losing financial aid or of not graduating on time. If withdrawing will result in a total course load of fewer than 12 credits, or if the student has withdrawn from courses in the past, then it is strongly recommended that the student speak with a staff member in the financial aid office before submitting a withdrawal form. The student may also want to speak with his/her advisor about summer courses or overloading to graduate on time. A student is not officially withdrawn from a course until the student has submitted the signed Approval Form to the Registrar’s Office.

Repeat Course Policy

  1. Repeat of Failures
    a.) If a student fails a course and then repeats it with a passing grade (excluding pass/fail grades), both the original failure and the repeated grade appear on the transcript but only the higher grade is used in the calculation of the GPA.
    b). If a student fails a course which was failed before, only one failure is calculated on the transcript. Ordinarily a student may repeat a course only once, but in case a student twice fails a course required for graduation, the student must petition the advisor and the dean of undergraduate education to be allowed to take the course a third time.
  2. Any course in which a C-, D or D+ was earned may be repeated once provided the student has permission of the academic advisor. Both grades will be recorded on the transcript but only the higher grade will be used in the calculation of the GPA.
  3. A course in which a grade higher than a C- was earned may not be repeated (except in 4 below).
  4. All nursing students are required to achieve a grade of C+ or higher in all nursing courses. Any nursing student who receives less than a C+ can repeat a maximum of only one nursing course one time throughout the BSN curriculum. All nursing courses must be repeated at DeSales University. All nursing students are required to achieve a grade of C or higher in all required pre-requisite courses (science, mathematics, psychology). Any nursing student who is eligible to repeat a required pre-requisite science, mathematics, psychology, or nursing course has the opportunity to do so in accordance with this “Repeat Course Policy” and the nursing progression policy, provided they have met the 2.75 cumulative GPA requirement at the end of the spring semester.
  5. Grades earned in repeat courses completed at Cedar Crest, Lafayette, Moravian, Muhlenberg, and Lehigh through the LVAIC cross registration policy may replace the previous grade in the calculation of GPA, though both grades will appear on the transcript.

Make-up of Failures

Failures of required courses must be made up by repeating the course with a passing grade at DeSales University or with a minimum grade of C- at another institution. Prior approval to take any course for transfer credit at another institution must be obtained from the associate dean of academic life, in accordance with the transfer course approval policy below. Grades earned in repeat courses completed at Cedar Crest, Lafayette, Moravian, Muhlenberg, and Lehigh through the LVAIC cross registration policy may replace the previous grade in the calculation of GPA, though both grades will appear on the transcript. For courses repeated outside of LVAIC institutions, the transfer grade will not be computed in the student’s GPA. DeSales University will not transfer course work completed at any institution unless the grade earned is at least a C-.

Academic Forgiveness

Students may petition the Academic Affairs Committee - Undergraduate Studies for Academic Forgiveness as described below:

First-Year Academic Forgiveness Policy

A first-year student (excluding transfer students) may petition the Dean of Undergraduate Education for one semester of academic forgiveness. Prior to petitioning the Dean of Undergraduate Education, the student must consult with the financial aid office to determine impact on financial aid eligibility. This request must be received prior to the start of the student’s second academic year. If granted, the student’s total credits earned and cumulative grade point average will be recomputed. This adjusted GPA will exclude all of the courses attempted during the forgiven semester. The complete record of the year’s work will remain on the student’s transcript and students must comply with the attendance policy for students on probation for the following semester. The application must be made in consultation with the academic advisor and must be accompanied by written explanation of the request. Once a semester has been forgiven the action is permanent and tuition will not be refunded. Please note, this policy may not be used to override progression policies.

Change of Major Academic Forgiveness Policy

A student who has been accepted into a new major may petition the Dean of Undergraduate Education for forgiveness of up to three courses specific to the original major in which a grade of D+, D, or F was earned, provided the courses are not required by the new major. Before a student may request forgiveness for specific courses, they must have successfully completed two consecutive semesters in their new major and attained a minimum term GPA of 2.50 in each semester. Prior to petitioning the Dean of Undergraduate Education, the student must consult with the financial aid office to determine the impact on financial aid eligibility. If granted, the student’s total credits earned and cumulative grade point average will be recomputed. This adjusted GPA will exclude all of the forgiven courses. However, the complete record of the student’s work will remain on their transcript. The application must be made in consultation with the academic advisor and must be accompanied by written explanation of the request. Once the approved courses have been forgiven the action is permanent and tuition will not be refunded.

Lifelong Learning Academic Forgiveness Policy

A Lifelong Learning student who formerly attended DeSales University and has returned after a minimum of five years with a cumulative GPA below 2.00 may petition the Dean of Undergraduate Education for academic forgiveness. Courses completed prior to returning in which a grade of D+, D, or F was earned are eligible for forgiveness. A maximum of 15 credits can be forgiven. Before a student may request forgiveness, they must have completed a minimum of two courses and a minimum of two sessions with a GPA of 2.50 as a Lifelong Learning student. Prior to petitioning the Dean of Undergraduate Education, the student must consult with the financial aid office to determine the impact on financial aid eligibility. If granted, the student’s total credits earned and cumulative grade point average will be recomputed. This adjusted GPA will exclude all of the forgiven courses. However, the complete record of the student’s work will remain on their transcript. The application must be made in consultation with the academic advisor and must be accompanied by written explanation of the request. Once the approved courses have been forgiven the action is permanent and tuition will not be refunded. Please note, this policy may not be used to override progression policies.

*A student will be permitted to exercise one academic forgiveness policy one time.

Transfer Course Approval

Prior approval for all transfer courses completed elsewhere must be secured from the associate dean of academic life if the student wishes to transfer the work to his/her program at DeSales, using the form available in the academic affairs office or via MyDSU. The approval column must be signed by a department chair or division head only in cases where a course is required for the major. The student completes this form, secures departmental or division signatures where applicable, and presents it for approval to the associate dean of academic life with a catalog description of the course to be taken. Individual courses will be evaluated in accordance with the undergraduate transfer policy, which can be found in Admissions .

At the conclusion of the course, the student must request that an official transcript be sent from the other college or university to the DeSales Registrar’s Office. Transfer credit is granted only for courses in which the student earned a grade of C- or better. The DeSales Registrar’s Office validates the approval transfer of credit. Transfer of grades is allowed only if a student cross registers at one of the LVAIC institutions (Cedar Crest, Lafayette, Moravian, Muhlenberg, and Lehigh). For classes at those institutions, a student must complete a cross registration form, available at the Registrar’s Office.

Change of Major

In order to request a change of major, the student must complete an approval form and obtain the signature of his/her current academic advisor. The student should take this form to the Registrar’s Office, who will circulate it to the department chair or division head of the new major for his/her consideration. The department chair or division head may require an interview with the student prior to making a decision. If approved, the form will be returned to the Registrar’s Office. The student will receive a confirmation of the change of major via e-mail. The graduation requirements for the major are determined by the catalog year in effect at the time of the student’s official acceptance to the major.

Credit by Examination

Undergraduate students who have acquired substantial knowledge in certain subject areas may apply for permission to verify this knowledge by examination, and consequently receive credit. Credit by examination may be earned for any course unless specifically excluded by the offering department (e.g., EN - 100 An Introduction to Academic Writing ; MA - 107 Mathematics for Teachers I: MOT/Mathematics MA - 109 Survey of Mathematics: MOT/Mathematics , MA - 110 Finite Mathematics: MOT/Mathematics , and MA - 111 Probability and Statistics: MOT/Mathematics ; and the 101-102 level of a foreign language). Students should verify with individual departments and/or divisions concerning other courses not open to credit by examination. An examination is always required, but other forms of evaluation may also be required by a department and/or division, e.g., written, laboratory, studio, or other type of evidence as is normally required by students who are regularly enrolled in the course.

Interested students may obtain from the department and/ or division titles of books normally listed in the course syllabus or other information as to course content. Students who believe they have the necessary knowledge, preparation, or background to establish credit by examination shall make application to the appropriate department chair and/or division head no later than the end of the third week of the term. If, in the opinion of the appropriate department chair and/or division head, the student has a reasonable chance of establishing credit, the student, by no later than the close of the term, shall arrange for the examination together with satisfactory completion of all course assignments and requirements demanded by the department. The nature of the examination given shall be entirely the decision of the department chair and/or division head in consultation with members of the department.

No course in which the student has at any time previously been registered for either credit, auditing, or enrichment purposes may be challenged under this program. A student attempting credit by examination shall not be entitled to formal instruction in the subject matter of the course. Ordinarily, a student may attempt only one challenge examination per semester.

Before the examination the student will choose one of two methods of evaluation:

  1. The student may request that the examination be assigned a specific letter grade. In this case the student may accept or decline the grade made. If the student accepts, the grade will be placed on the student’s permanent record. If the student declines, the grade will not be recorded, but the student will forfeit any further credit by examination opportunity in the course and receive no credit.
  2. The examination may be evaluated as Pass or Fail and recorded on the permanent record if passed. Failures will not be recorded on the student’s permanent record, but the student will forfeit any further credit by examination opportunity in the course and receive no credit.

A $75 administrative fee is required of all full-time traditional students. All other students, including ACCESS students, are required to pay 30% of the course tuition to sit for the exam.

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

DeSales University offers a student the possibility of receiving credit by examination through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). A new or matriculated student may receive up to 75 credits (25 courses) for demonstrating college-level competency on these exams developed by the Educational Testing Service. Credits earned through CLEP are considered transfer credits (See Transfer Policy). By recognizing college-level achievement learned through employment experiences, purposeful private study, military-industrial-business training, or advanced work in high school, this program gives the student an opportunity to reduce the cost of a degree at DeSales University in terms of time and money. DeSales University has been designated as a CLEP Testing Center. CLEP examinations are computer-based and students obtain their scores immediately. Only scores sent directly from CLEP to DeSales University are considered official and will be accepted.

The CLEP examinations are of two types, the General Examinations and the Subject Examinations. Both types measure the knowledge and understanding of factual information, as well as the ability to see relationships and apply basic principles to new situations. These examinations are based on typical college courses offered across the country.

CLEP General Examinations. The five CLEP General Examinations measure material often covered in the first two years of college as part of a general liberal arts requirement. The examinations in humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, and history are 90-minute multiple choice tests. It is important to realize that the CLEP General Examinations are analogous to end-of-the-year exams and require more than a cursory knowledge of the subject area.

  1. A student is eligible to take any or all of the General Examinations if he or she has not taken or transferred more than one course in the specific areas covered by the exam or exams.
  2. If the minimum acceptable score is received on a General Examination, the student will receive six credits. These credits fulfill General Education requirements, where applicable.

CLEP Subject Examinations: The CLEP Subject Examinations measure the achievement of principles, concepts, and knowledge from specific college courses. All of the Subject Examinations are 90-minute multiple choice tests. Depending on the particular test and the score obtained, a student may earn credit for one or two courses.

  1. A student may take any of the Subject Examinations any time before graduation, provided the student has not taken that course for credit or audit.
  2. Course credit earned from the Subject Examinations can be used to satisfy General Education requirements, where applicable.
  3. A student must have the permission of his or her department chair and/or division head to test out of major requirements.

CLEP Examinations may be repeated three months after the first administration. No CLEP Examination may be taken more than twice.

Students who are interested in the CLEP Examinations should inquire at the ACCESS Office.

Advanced Placement (AP)

Students seeking advanced placement must take the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examination(s) in the subject(s) involved. Only the results of the first administration of each examination can be considered as a basis for granting credit, i.e., students may not retake exams until they achieve a satisfactory score. In addition, all examination results to be considered for advanced placement and/or credit are to be submitted before the applicant’s matriculation in DeSales University. Only scores sent directly to DeSales University from the College Board are considered official and will be accepted.

Students who achieve scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement Economics: Macroeconomics Examination will receive 3 credits in place of EC 209 ; and those students who achieve scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the Economics: Microeconomics Examination will receive 3 credits in place of EC 210 .

DeSales University abides by the following policy with regard to the Advanced Placement Examinations in English Language and Composition and Literature and Composition: a score of 1, 2, or 3, no advanced placement or credit; a score of 4, the student is awarded 3 credits for EN 103  and is exempt from that course; a score of 5, the student is awarded 6 credits for EN 103  and EN 104  and is exempt from both courses.

Entering students who achieve a score of 3 on the World Language Advanced Placement Examination (e.g., French or Spanish) will receive 3 credits for 201 (Intermediate, one semester); they will be required to take one additional language course. Students with a grade of 4 or higher will receive 6 credits for 201 and 202 (Intermediate, both semesters); they are exempt from the language requirement.

With regard to the AP European History Exam: for a score of 5, a student is granted 6 credits in place of HI 201  and HI 202 ; for a score of 4, a student is granted 3 credits in place of HI 202 . A score of 1, 2, or 3 earns neither credit nor exemption. Students receiving credit are exempt from these required courses.

With regard to the AP World History Exam: for a score of 5, a student is granted 6 credits in place of HI 201  and HI 262 ; for a score of 4, a student is granted 3 credits in place of HI 262 . A score of 1, 2, or 3 earns neither credit nor exemption. Students receiving credit are exempt from these required courses.

The Department of Mathematics/Computer Science will grant three credits in place of MA 121  for a score of 4 or higher on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination or a score of 3 on the Calculus BC examination; and six credits in place of MA 121  and MA 122  for a score of 4 or higher on the Calculus BC examination. Also, for a score of 4 or higher on the AP Statistics examination, 3 credits will be awarded in place of MA 111 . For a score of 5 on the AP Computer Science A examination, 3 credits will be awarded in place of CS 211 . Finally, for a score of 4 or higher on the AP Computer Science Principles examination, a student may earn 3 credits as a free elective.

The Department of Biology grants credit for the Advanced Placement Examinations as follows: for a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Biology Examination, students will receive 4 credits in place of BI 151 , for a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Environmental Science Examination students receive 4 credits in place of BI 242 .  

The Department of Chemistry and Physics grants credit for the Advanced Placement Examinations as follows: for a score of 4 on the Advanced Placement Chemistry Examination, students will receive 4 credits in place of CH 101 , and for a score of 5, students will receive 8 credits in place of CH 101   and CH 102  ; for a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Physics Examination 1: Algebra-Based, students will receive 5 credits for PH 201  ; for a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Physics Examination 2: Algebra-Based, students will receive 5 credits for PH 202 . Students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Physics Examination Form C: Mechanics will receive 5 credits for PH 201  . Students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Physics Examination Form C: Electricity and Magnetism will receive 5 credits for PH 202 .

A student who scores 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement Examination in Music Theory will receive 3 credits for FA 115 . A student scoring 3 or higher in Music Listening and Literature may earn 3 credits as a free elective.

Students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Art History examination will be awarded 3 credits in place of the Humanities 3 requirement.

Students achieving a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Psychology Examination will be awarded 3 credits in place of PS 109 .

The Social Sciences Department will grant 3 credits in place of PS 109  to students who acheive a score of 4 or 5 on tne Advanced Placement Psychology Examination. Course credit for PO 103  will be granted to any students who score 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in American Politics. The Social Sciences Department will grant 3 credits in place of PO - 107 Central European Nations  for a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Government and Politics: Comparative examination.

For a score of 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement Art 2D Design Examination, students will be awarded 3 credits in place of a free elective.

For a score of 3 or higher on the AP Human Geography Examination, a student will receive 3 credits in place of PO - 108 International Politics .

In all other subjects, the AP exam in question is evaluated by the pertinent academic department that recommends whether advanced placement and/or credit should be awarded.

Separation from DeSales University

  1. Withdrawal in Good Standing
    Students are eligible to withdraw in good standing if they are not on probation for either academic or disciplinary reasons. The process of withdrawal is initiated by contacting the Registrar’s Office to request a Withdrawal Form. The registrar will determine the official withdrawal date and mark it on the form.

    The official withdrawal deadline for each semester is listed in the Academic Calendar. Withdrawal after the deadline will result in a failure (F) for all courses registered in that semester. Given that the last date of attendance before a withdrawal may impact a student’s financial responsibilities, it is recommended that a student interested in a withdrawal speak directly with the Bursar’s Office and/or Financial Aid Office for additional information about the implications for their tuition and financial aid.

    Students granted a withdrawal in good standing and who have not taken any courses at another institution during their separation from DeSales may return to DeSales University without further formal action by the Committee on Admissions. However, students must submit a written request for readmission to the registrar, or the ACCESS Office for ACCESS students.

    Students who have taken courses at another institution during their separation from DeSales must reapply through the admissions office.
     
  2. ​​Withdrawal on Academic Probation
    Students who are on probation for academic reasons are eligible to withdraw. The process of withdrawal while on academic probation is initiated by contacting the Registrar’s Office to request a Withdrawal Form. When completing the form, the student must designate “Withdrawal on Probation” as the reason for doing so. The registrar will determine the official withdrawal date and mark it on the form. Students who wish to return to DeSales University after withdrawal on academic probation must reapply through the admissions office.
     
  3. Leave of Absence
    To request a leave of absence, traditional day students must contact the associate dean of academic life. The request should contain the reasons for requesting the leave of absence and an estimate of its duration, usually not to exceed one year. Students requesting a leave of absence for medical reasons may be required to submit documentation from their health care provider. Ordinarily, leaves are not approved after the withdrawal deadline. Students may not be on disciplinary probation and must resolve all financial indebtedness to DeSales University. Students majoring in nursing must also comply with the “Leave of Absence from the Nursing Program ” policy, which can be found under the Nursing major heading.

    Students granted a leave may return to DeSales University by submitting a written request to the associate dean of academic life no later than one month before the beginning of the term for which reentry is sought. If the authorized period for the leave of absence has expired without an approved request to extend the leave, the student must reapply for admission through the admissions office.

    Given that the last date of attendance before a leave may impact a student’s financial responsibilities, it is recommended that a student interested in a leave speak directly with the Bursar’s Office and/or Financial Aid Office for additional information about the implications for their tuition and financial aid. Questions about housing should be addressed to the residence life office.

  4. Academic Dismissal
    DeSales University reserves the right to dismiss a student for academic reasons whenever there is clear evidence that the student is no longer deriving benefit from its educational program. A student is liable for dismissal if the student has:
    a.  been placed on academic probation for two consecutive semesters;
    b.  earned a grade point average of less than 1.00 in any semester, regardless of whether or not his or her cumulative grade point average is below the minimum non-probationary standard.

    A list of students liable for dismissal is presented by the dean of undergraduate education to the Committee on Academic Regulations at the end of each semester. The decision to dismiss rests with this committee, subject to the approval of the provost. The words “Academic Dismissal” appear on the official transcript of a student who is dismissed for academic reasons.

  5. Reinstatement

    Students who are required to withdraw for academic reasons are ordinarily not eligible for reinstatement until they have successfully completed 8 courses (24 credits) at an accredited institution of higher education. Reinstatement is not automatic; rather students must reapply to the college and submit all required application documents. Students will be evaluated by the admissions office to determine if they have met the qualifications to be reinstated at the institution.

    Before the student is reinstated to the University, the student’s bursar account will be checked. If an outstanding balance exists, the student must clear the account before being permitted to return.

    Before the student is reinstated to the University, the student’s disciplinary record will also be checked. Any violations of the student code of conduct will be taken into consideration as part of the admission’s decision.

    Financial aid eligibility will be determined based on demonstration of need, filing by the deadlines, and availability of funds. Additionally, students must meet financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards to be eligible for financial aid. For more information regarding academic progress, refer to “Financial Aid and Scholarships ” of this catalog.
     
  6. Suspension and Expulsion
    Occasionally students are separated from the University for non-academic reasons. Usually the letter of suspension or expulsion clearly states the conditions of the action taken by the University and the possibilities for further association with the University. Please consult the Student Handbook for a fuller explanation of these types of separation from the University.

Traditional Day Students in Fall/Spring ACCESS Courses

If courses are not offered in the day session, limited seats may be available for traditional day students in ACCESS courses under unusual circumstances. The student must request an exception by submitting a completed Approval Form (available in MyDSU under the Forms and Documents heading as well as in the Academic Affairs Office) to the associate dean of academic life after obtaining approval from the academic advisor and the department chair or division head who oversees the course. If registration of an ACCESS course is allowed the following regulations apply:

  1. Courses during Session 1 through 4 are considered part of a traditional day student’s five-course load. Students may also overload with ACCESS courses on a space-available basis, if they qualify to do so.
  2. Registration for ACCESS courses must be completed by the date for changing or adding courses as indicated on the academic calendar for each traditional day semester. After the date for changing or adding courses, traditional day students are not permitted to withdraw from a traditional day course and add an ACCESS course. Permission to withdraw from a traditional day course and add an ACCESS course after the date for changing and adding courses is granted by the dean of undergraduate education only by way of exception and for serious reasons (e.g., serious illness). The desire merely to improve one’s GPA or to avoid a failure is not a sufficient reason for granting this exception.
  3. Permission to withdraw from ACCESS courses must be obtained from the student’s academic advisor and from the Director of the Academic Success Center. Withdrawal from ACCESS courses will follow the applicable deadlines for these courses, which are published in the ACCESS calendar, available online.
  4.  Students enrolled in ACCESS courses must follow the ACCESS calendar for those courses in all respects. This is especially important for breaks

Traditional Day Students in Summer/Winter ACCESS Courses

Traditional day students who want to take ACCESS summer and winter session courses must register for them in WebAdvisor and pay the appropriate tuition. The tuition for summer courses is due before the summer course begins and cannot be deferred until the fall semester. The tuition for winter courses is due before the winter course begins and cannot be deferred until the spring semester. These courses may not be considered part of a fall or spring course load.

Traditional Day Students in Graduate Courses

Ordinarily, full-time students who have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 and have senior status may enroll in graduate courses while fulfilling the requirements for an undergraduate degree. Ordinarily, they may register for no more than two graduate courses at a time and may accumulate no more than nine graduate credits unless specifically required by the program. The students must have the permission of their division head (or his/ her delegate), the appropriate graduate program director, the dean of undergraduate education, and the dean of graduate education. Departments which sponsor accelerated programs may establish criteria which are more stringent than those delineated above.

Ordinarily, students may not carry an overload course during a semester or session in which they are enrolled in a graduate course. Students may not take the graduate course(s) for a Pass/ Fail grade. Registration is on a space-available basis. All prescribed course sequences and all prerequisites must be followed. Full-time undergraduate traditional day students who register for both undergraduate and graduate courses as part of their five course load pay no additional tuition.

Online and Hybrid Courses for Traditional Day Students

To prepare all students to engage in future online educational opportunities as a form of lifelong learning, DeSales University offers full-semester online courses specifically for traditional day students. Traditional day students, with the exception of first-semester first-year students, may register for as many as two of these online courses in any fall or spring semester, provided that they do not exceed a total of six such courses during the entirety of their undergraduate program. Final exams for these online courses may be administered in a classroom on campus or online, at the discretion of the instructor. Traditional day students seeking to enroll in ACCESS courses should review the policies under the headings immediately above this one, particularly “Traditional Day Students in Fall/Spring ACCESS Courses.”

ACCESS Students in Traditional Day Courses

ACCESS registrations in traditional day courses will be accommodated after pre-registration on a space available basis. ACCESS students who need to get into a traditional day course that is closed due to space limitations (e.g., science and computer labs, smart classrooms, and limits set by the University for core courses) must obtain a signature from the chair of the department offering the course.

ACCESS Students in Graduate Courses

ACCESS students and other undergraduate students who pay tuition on a per-credit basis, have senior status, and have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0, may enroll in graduate courses while fulfilling the requirements for an undergraduate degree. Ordinarily they may register for no more than two graduate courses at a time and may accumulate no more than nine graduate credits unless specifically required by the program. The students must have the permission of the appropriate division head (or his/her delegate), the dean of undergraduate education, the appropriate graduate program director, and the dean of graduate education. Departments which sponsor accelerated programs may establish criteria which are more stringent than those delineated above.

Ordinarily, students may not carry an overload course during a semester or session in which they are enrolled in a graduate course. Students may not take the graduate course(s) for a Pass/Fail grade. Registration is on a space-available basis. All prescribed course sequences and all prerequisites must be followed. These students must pay applicable graduate tuition.

Flex Classes

A Flex class is a class in which all live (synchronous) class sessions may be, at the student’s discretion, experienced either in the traditional physical classroom or remotely through web-based video conferencing technology. A Flex student may choose to experience all, some, or none of the live sessions remotely. Students may vary their attendance mode without prior notice from class meeting to class meeting. Additional information about Flex class variations, administrative standards, and behavior standards for remote students is included in the Flex Class Policy available in MyDSU or from the Center for Educational Resources and Technology.

Course Computing/Technical Requirements

It is the responsibility of each student to ensure that they meet the minimum technical requirements of each course. General technical requirements are detailed at www.desales.edu/academics/online-learning-at-desales. Course-specific technical requirements are described in the course syllabus.

Cancellation of Courses and Elimination of Programs

The University reserves the right to cancel courses due to insufficient enrollment, staffing difficulties, or other contingencies. In such cases, students will be informed in a timely manner so that other courses might be selected.

Occasionally, majors, minors, or certificate programs may be terminated. Reasonable efforts will be made so that students who have matriculated into them will be able to complete their programs in a timely fashion.

Academic Honesty Policy

Acts of academic dishonesty violate the deepest convictions of the University community and will not be tolerated. Such acts, including plagiarism, cheating, and other unacceptable behaviors are strictly prohibited. This policy applies to all academic courses, regardless of the method of delivery (e.g., traditional lecture, laboratory, online, and hybrid courses).

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of copying the ideas, and/or speculations, and/or language of any other person or persons, without acknowledgment, and presenting this material as your own original work to satisfy any academic requirement or complete any academic project. Plagiarism takes place even in the event that you make use of or paraphrase another person’s unique and distinctive terminology, whether it be a single word or phrase or extended passage, without acknowledgment. Such use is considered plagiarism regardless of your intent to deceive. The following acts will be deemed acts of plagiarism, though the list is not exhaustive.

Presenting as your own

  1. Published or unpublished work prepared by others, or dictated by others, including papers purchased or borrowed from any person or organization;
  2. Lab reports or exercises copied from or dictated by others;
  3. Homework assignments of any kind copied from or dictated by others;
  4. Oral reports copied from or dictated by others;
  5. Formal lecture notes incorporated into your work;
  6. A computer solution developed by someone else

Cheating

Dishonest acts that give any student an unfair advantage are considered cheating. The following acts will be deemed acts of cheating, though the list is not exhaustive:

  1. Using materials not specifically allowed by the instructor during the taking of an examination, test, or quiz; for example,
    1. Use of material written by another student either with or without his or her knowledge; or
    2. Use of crib notes, no matter by whom prepared; or,
    3. Use of texts and/or supplementary marginal notations in texts; or,
    4. Use of notes written on the surface of the desk at which examination is being taken; or,
    5. Use of electronic aids, including but not limited to calculators, phones, tablets, and other mobile devices;
  2. Unauthorized collaboration or communication, either in the giving or receiving of information, during an examination, test, quiz, laboratory report, or assignment (regardless of the format, e.g., take-home, online, in-class, or on-campus);
  3. Stealing, using, possessing, or transmitting verbally or otherwise actual examinations, tests, quizzes or portions thereof, or other confidential information before or during the time of the exam.
  4. Submitting any material for a grade in one class that has been previously or simultaneously submitted for a grade in another class, in whole or in part, without documented authorization from both instructors;
  5. Arranging or attempting to arrange to have your own academic work done in whole or in part by someone else, with or without compensation;
  6. Falsifying of laboratory or research data or results; or, falsifying or inventing bibliographical entries for research papers;
  7. Willfully aiding or abetting any act of cheating and/or plagiarism.

Other Unacceptable Behaviors

A number of unacceptable behaviors cannot properly be termed either plagiarism or cheating, yet they are also prohibited. The following acts are considered acts of unacceptable behavior, though the list is not exhaustive.

  1. Misuse or abuse of Trexler Library resources, including but not limited to:
    1. Unauthorized removal of library resources;
    2. Hiding library resource materials of any kind within the library;
    3. Defacement or mutilation of library resources (e.g., underlining, highlighting, or removing paragraphs or pages);
  2. Copying right-protected print or non-print materials beyond accepted norms;
  3. Falsifying the reason for an absence from class;
  4. Misrepresenting yourself, or allowing yourself to be misrepresented, by means technological or otherwise; for example, a. Responding for someone else using classroom participation devices (e.g., clickers, cell phones, or other electronic devices) in a physical classroom, or allowing someone else to respond for you; b. Logging in to an online learning environment (e.g., an online course or learning management system) using someone else’s credentials, or allowing someone else to log in using your credentials;
  5. Misrepresenting the number of hours completed and/or the tasks completed in a credit-bearing experience (e.g., internship, research, practicum, clinical rotation, etc.);
  6. Withholding knowledge of an incident of cheating or plagiarism from the individual instructor to whom the work is submitted.

Procedures

  1. The faculty member or, when appropriate, university professional staff member, who discovers or is made aware of a case of plagiarism, cheating, or unacceptable behavior will, on his/her own initiative and in a manner he or she deems appropriate, normally resolve the situation with the student in a private, one-on-one setting. The faculty/staff member may alternatively choose to resolve matters in consultation with the appropriate administrator (the dean of undergraduate education, in the case of undergraduate students; the dean of graduate education, in the case of graduate students).
  2. When a faculty/staff member and student meet to resolve a case of plagiarism, cheating, or unacceptable behavior, the faculty/staff member, having previously determined that the case before him/her is beyond question a proven and unmistakable offense, will present his/her position, hear the student’s position, and in the end, may determine that ignorance on the part of the student warrants only a warning to the student. If, however, he/she determines a degree of guilt on the part of the student, he/she is empowered to levy any one of the following sanctions:
    1. grade penalty for the individual assignment
    2. grade penalty for the course
    3. failure in the course.
      In the case of library violations, temporary suspension or permanent loss of library privileges may be levied.
  3. The faculty member will compose a letter stating the nature of the offense as well as the sanction imposed. The faculty/ staff member will send the letter to the student and will send a copy of the letter to the appropriate administrator to be kept on file. Should there be an appeal, any subsequent actions in regard to the incident will be duly recorded by the appropriate administrator.
  4. Should it be determined that this is a second offense involving this student, the incident will then be resolved by the appropriate administrator in conjunction with the faculty/ staff member. In such cases, the appropriate administrator’s decision for resolution may supersede the original decision of the faculty/staff member, when made without knowledge of the first offense.
  5. In the case of a second offense, the administrator will solicit written statements from the faculty/staff member and the student in question. He/she may then meet with the student and/or faculty/staff member for any needed clarification.
  6. On the occasion of a second offense, the vice president for academic affairs may impose the penalty of dismissal from the University.
  7. In the event a faculty/staff member and appropriate administrator working in consultation determine that an egregious breach of academic ethics has been committed, the student may be liable for dismissal from a major, a program, or the University, even on the first offense.
  8. When the appropriate administrator reaches a decision, he/ she will inform the student of that decision in writing and will also inform the student of his/her right to appeal the decision and/or the severity of the sanction before the full Academic Affairs Committee. The faculty/staff member involved also will have the right to appeal. The appropriate Academic Affairs Committee (undergraduate or graduate) will hear all appeals-undergraduate, graduate, ACCESS, and faculty.
  9. The words “Academic Dismissal” appear on the official transcript of a student who is dismissed for academic reasons.

Academic Due Process

The undergraduate student who feels that he or she has an academic grievance should follow the procedure outlined below:

The student should first discuss the problem or grievance with the faculty/staff member. If, following discussion with the faculty/staff member, the student is not satisfied and continues to believe that he/she has not been dealt with fairly, he/she should discuss the grievance with the chair of the department and/or the division head involved. Students may be asked to present their grievance in writing. If the matter is not resolved at this level, the student has recourse to the dean of undergraduate education.

As a final appeal, the student may request the Academic Affairs Committee to evaluate the situation and make a recommendation to the provost. This request must be presented in writing and include the pertinent information regarding the situation. The Academic Affairs Committee will normally act upon such an appeal within one month of its receipt. The provost’s decision will be final.

When the Academic Affairs Committee does not meet (e.g., during the summer) the order of appeal shall be: faculty/ staff member, chair of the department and/or the division head involved, dean of undergraduate education, and provost.